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2024, 02-06 Study Session AGENDA SPOKANE VALLEY CITY COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING STUDY SESSION FORMAT Tuesday, February 6, 2024 6:00 p.m. Remotely via ZOOM Meeting and In Person at Spokane Valley City Hall, Council Chambers 10210 E. Sprague Ave. Spokane Valley, WA 99206 Council Requests Please Silence Your Cell Phones During Council Meeting NOTE: Members of the public may attend Spokane Valley Council meetings in-person at the address provided above, or via Zoom at the link below. Members of the public will be allowed to comment in- person or via Zoom as described below. Public comments will only be accepted for those items noted on If making a comment via Zoom, comments must be received by 4:00 pm the day of the meeting. Sign up to Provide Oral Public Comment at the Meeting via Calling-In Submit Written Public Comment Prior to the Meeting Join the Zoom WEB Meeting ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CALL TO ORDER ROLL CALL APPROVAL OF AGENDA PROCLAMATION: GENERAL PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITY: This is an opportunity for the public to speak on any subject except agenda action items, as public comments will be taken on those items where indicated. Please keep comments to matters within the jurisdiction of the City Government. This is not an opportunity for questions or discussion. Diverse points of view are welcome but please keep remarks civil. Remarks will be limited to three minutes per person. If a person engages in disruptive behavior or makes individual personal attacks regarding matters unre comment time before the three-minute mark. To comment via zoom: use the link above for oral or written comments as per those directions. To comment at the meeting in person: speakers may sign in to speak but it is not required. A sign-in sheet will be provided at the meeting. ACTION ITEMS: 1. Ordinance 24-001 Amending Planning Commission Meeting Requirements Tony Beattie \[public comment opportunity\] 2. Motion Consideration: Bridge Investment Program Adam Jackson, Dan Baker \[public comment opportunity\] 3. Motion Consideration: Mayoral Appointment, Planning Commission Mayor Haley \[public comment opportunity\] NON-ACTION ITEMS: 4. Admin Report Recruitment and Retention Plan Chief Ellis 5. Admin Report: Pines Rd Grade Separation Project Update Erica Amsden, Bill Helbig, Gloria Mantz 6. Admin Report: Potential Grant Opportunity, HUD Gloria Mantz, Eric Robison 7. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley Council Agenda February 06, 2024 Page 1 of 2 COUNCIL COMMENTS CITY MANAGER COMMENTS EXECUTIVE SESSION: Pending Litigation \[RCW 42.30.110(1)(i)\] (Proposed motion: I move Council adjourn into executive session for approximately 40 minutes to discuss pending litigation, and that no action will be taken upon return to open session.) ADJOURN Council Agenda February 06, 2024 Page 2 of 2 CITY OF SPOKANE VALLEY Request for Council Action Meeting Date: February 6, 2024 Department Director Approval: Check all that apply: consent old business new business public hearing information admin. report pending legislation executive session AGENDA ITEM TITLE: First Ordinance Reading: Ordinance 24-001 Amending Planning Commission Meeting Requirements GOVERNING LEGISLATION: Chapter 18.10 Spokane Valley Municipal Code (SVMC); chapter 36.70A RCW; RCW 35A.63.140; RCW 35.63.040 PREVIOUS COUNCIL ACTION TAKEN: Approval of Ordinance 07-015 § 4. Administrative Report re Ordinance 24-001 on January 9, 2024. BACKGROUND: Ordinance 24-001 is a city-initiated code text amendment (CTA-2023-0004) revising SVMC 18.10.030 to provide flexibility in the number of required Planning Commission meetings. Currently, SVMC 18.10.030 requires the Planning Commission to meet at least one time every month. If passed, this change would require the Planning Commission to hold at least one regular meeting each month, not less than nine months in each year. Further, it would ensure that there are not two consecutive months without a meeting. The Planning Commission considered CTA-2023-0004 at a study session on October 12, 2023, and held a public hearing on November 9, 2023. Along with a draft ordinance, City Council is provided with the Planning Commission’s signed Findings and Recommendation. This draft ordinance also takes into account the minor language change proposed by Council at the January 9, 2024 Administrative Report, which would cancel the first regularly scheduled Planning Commission meeting in a January that follows City Council elections. OPTIONS: Move to advance Ordinance 24-001 related to Planning Commission meeting requirements to a second ordinance reading; or take other action deemed appropriate. RECOMMENDED ACTION OR MOTION: Move to advance Ordinance 24-001 related to Planning Commission meeting requirements to a second ordinance reading. BUDGET/FINANCIAL IMPACTS: There are no anticipated financial impacts. STAFF CONTACT: Tony Beattie, Senior Deputy City Attorney ATTACHMENTS: 1) Presentation 2) Draft Ordinance 24-001 3) CTA-2023-0004 Findings and Recommendation of the Spokane Valley Planning Commission DRAFT CITY OF SPOKANE VALLEY SPOKANE COUNTY, WASHINGTON ORDINANCE NO. 24-001 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SPOKANE VALLEY, SPOKANE COUNTY, WASHINGTON, AMENDING SPOKANE VALLEY MUNICIPAL CODE SECTION 18.10.030 RELATED TO THE PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING RULES, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. WHEREAS, the City of Spokane Valley Planning Commission was created pursuant to chapter 18.10 of the Spokane Valley Municipal Code (SVMC); and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission is tasked with determining its meeting schedule within the bounds set by SVMC 18.10.030; and WHEREAS, pursuant to the Planning Commission Rules of Procedure, the Planning Commission meets at 6:00 p.m. on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month unless a meeting is cancelled; and WHEREAS, pursuant to SVMC 18.10.030(B) the Planning Commission is currently required to meet at least one time every month; and WHEREAS, decreasing the required meetings of the Planning Commission provides flexibility without compromising efficiency; and WHEREAS, CTA-2023-0004 is a City-initiated code text amendment to revise SVMC 18.10.030 to decrease the number of required meetings to one regular meeting each month not less than nine months in each year; and WHEREAS, on October 5, 2023 the Washington State Department of Commerce was notified pursuant to RCW 36.70A.106, providing a 60 day notice of intent to adopt amendments to Spokane Valley development regulations; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held a Study Session related to CTA-2023-0004 on October 12, 2023; and WHEREAS, on October 20, 2023 and October 27, 2023, notice of the Planning Commission public hearing for CTA-2023-0004 was published in the Spokane Valley News Herald; and WHEREAS, on November 9, 2023, the Planning Commission held a public hearing to receive evidence and information, and to provide an opportunity for public testimony. The Commissioners subsequently voted 7-0 to recommend that the City Council approve the CTA-2023-0004 with the modification that there never be two consecutive months without a meeting; and Ordinance 24-001, amending SVMC 18.10.030 Page 1 of 3 DRAFT WHEREAS, the Planning Commission approved the Findings and Recommendations as presented on December 14, 2023; and WHEREAS, the proposed amendments to SVMC 18.10.030 are in the best interests of the health, safety, and welfare of the citizens of the City. NOW THEREFORE, the City Council of the City of Spokane Valley, Spokane County, Washington, do ordain as follows: Section 1. Purpose. The purpose of this Ordinance is to amend section 18.10.030 of the Spokane Valley Municipal Code (SVMC) so as to provide for flexibility in the number of required meetings held by the Planning Commission. Section 2. Findings and Conclusions. The City Council acknowledges that the Planning Commission conducted appropriate investigation and study, held a public hearing on the proposed amendments, and recommends approval of the amendments. The City Council has read and considered the Planning Commission’s findings and recommendation, and makes the following findings: A. The proposed amendment is consistent with the applicable provisions of the Comprehensive Plan: Findings: The Comprehensive Plan does not identify specific goals and policies relevant to the Planning Commission procedures but identifies specific goals and policies to be considered in the development of the comprehensive plan and development regulations. A review of the goals and policies did not identify anything inconsistent with the proposed CTA. The proposed amendment is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan as the amendment establishes the minimum number of meetings required for the Planning Commission to conduct its business as it relates to Comprehensive Plan amendments and other matters such as code text amendments. B. The proposed amendment does bear a substantial relation to public health, safety, welfare, and protection of the environment. Findings: The proposed amendment bears substantial relation to public health, safety, welfare, and protection of the environment. The proposed amendments clarify the required number of meetings the Planning Commission must hold consistent with state law and does not reduce the number of meetings necessary for the Planning Commission to conduct business, nor does it reduce the number of regular meetings scheduled pursuant to the Planning Commission Rules of Procedure. C. Conclusion: The proposed text amendment is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and bears a substantial relation to public health, safety, welfare, and protection of the environment. Ordinance 24-001, amending SVMC 18.10.030 Page 2 of 3 DRAFT Section 3.Amendment.SVMC 18.10.030 is hereby amended as follows: 18.10.030 Meetings – Rules. A. The planning commission shall every year organize and elect from its members a chair, who shall preside at all meetings of the planning commission and perform such other functions as determined by rule. A vice chair shall be elected to preside in the absence of the chair. A majority of the planning commission members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, and a majority vote of those present shall be necessary to carry any proposition. B. The planning commission shall determine a regular meeting schedule (time, place and frequency) and shall meet hold at least one regular meeting each time every month not less than nine months in each year, provided that there are never two consecutive months without a meeting. Provided further thatthe Planning Commission shall not meet on the first regularly scheduled meeting date in any January which follows City Council elections. All meetings shall be open to the public. C. The planning commission shall adopt such rules and procedures as are necessary for the conduct of business, subject to the approval of city council, and shall keep a recording of its proceedings. D. All hearings before the planning commission shall be conducted in the manner set forth in Appendix B. Section 4. Other sections unchanged. All other provisions of chapter 18.10 SVMC not specifically referenced hereto shall remain in full force and effect. Section 5. Severability. If any section, sentence, clause or phrase of this Ordinance should be held to be invalid or unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity or unconstitutionality shall not affect the validity or constitutionality of any other section, sentence, clause or phrase of this Ordinance. Section 6. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect five days after publication of this Ordinance or a summary thereof in the official newspaper of the City of Spokane Valley as provided by law. Passed this day of , 2024. Pam Haley, Mayor ATTEST: Marci Patterson, City Clerk Approved As To Form: Office of the City Attorney Date of Publication: Effective Date: Ordinance 24-001, amending SVMC 18.10.030 Page 3 of 3 Draft CTA-2023-0004Page1/1 SVMC 18.10.030 18.10.030 Meetings – Rules. A. The planning commission shall every year organize and elect from its members a chair, who shall preside at all meetings of the planning commission and perform such other functions as determined by rule. A vice chair shall be elected to preside in the absence of the chair. A majority of the planning commission members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, and a majority vote of those present shall be necessary to carry any proposition. B. The planning commission shall determine a regular meeting schedule (time, place and frequency) and shall meet hold at least one regular meeting time every each month not less than nine months in each year. All meetings shall be open to the public. C. The planning commission shall adopt such rules and procedures as are necessary for the conduct of business, subject to the approval of city council, and shall keep a recording of its proceedings. D. All hearings before the planning commission shall be conducted in the manner set forth in Appendix B. CITY OF SPOKANE VALLEY Request for Council Action Meeting Date: February 6, 2024 Department Director Approval: Check all that apply: consent old business new business public hearing information admin. report pending legislation executive session AGENDA ITEM TITLE: Motion Consideration: Potential Grant Opportunity - Bridge Investment Program FY24 GOVERNING LEGISLATION: RCW 35.77.010: Six-Year Transportation Improvement Program PREVIOUS COUNCIL ACTION TAKEN: January 23, 2024, City Council consensus to develop the Sullivan/Trent Interchange project application for the FY24 BIP call for projects. January 23, 2024, City Council motion consideration to submit the project to FY24 RAISE. January 2, 2024, Council consensus to develop the Sullivan/Trent Interchange project application for the FY24 RAISE call for projects. December 12, 2023, City Council approved its 2024 legislative agenda. September 26, 2023, City Council approved staff to contract with KPFF Consulting Engineers for the project’s design phase. January 31, 2023, Council authorized the City Manager to apply to RAISE 2023 December 20, 2022, City Council passed a motion to advance Alternative 2 – Diamond Interchange w/ peanut Roundabouts to final design. December 20, 2022, City Council approved its 2023 legislative agenda. December 13, 2022: Administrative report: Consensus to bring forward the Alternative #2- Diamond Interchange w/ Peanut Roundabouts to final design. October 4, 2022: Administrative report providing a project update. March 22, 2022: Administrative report providing a project update. In 2021, the City partnered with Spokane County to submit a joint application to the United States Department of Transportation. The application was not awarded funding. Since 2019, the City has identified the Sullivan & Trent Interchange project as a City priority project and included it on its federal agenda. BACKGROUND: The US Department of Transportation (USDOT) issued a call for projects in December 2023 for the BIP (Bridge Investment Program) discretionary grant program. Bridge rehabilitation, preservation, and protection projects will be funded on a competitive basis with respect to the following criteria: improve safety, efficiency, and reliability of the movement of people and freight over bridges. Projects are scored based on their merits with respect for the following: environmental sustainability, equity and proportional impacts that improve quality of life, and workforce development addressing local inclusive economic development. Projects are also scored on project readiness and cost effectiveness. Critical Bridge Program details are: Total Available Program Funds: $9.62 billion nationwide (rolling, 2023-2026) $2.41 billion available FY24 Award Range (Min-Max): $2.5 - $80 million Match Amount: 80% BIP Program max funding 86.5% Federal max. participation 13.5% Non-Federal min. Application Due Date: March 19, 2024 Page 1 of 2 Obligation Date (if awarded):No later than September 30, 2027 Staff recommendsubmittingthe Sullivan& Trent Interchange Projectto this call for projects. To date,the City has secured roughly $6.6Moffederal grant funds for the project.The city has also set aside $1M of local funds.The securedfundingfully fundsthe engineering and right-of-way phases,leavingthe construction phase of theproject unfunded. For the BIPprogram, applicationrequests can only seek funds for “future eligible expenses”and awards cannot be used to reimburse applicants for funds/phases already obligated. For example, in 2023, staffinitiated theengineering phase of the project. Therefore,thecosts for the engineering phaseare not considered when calculating the application’s “future eligible expense”for theproject. Related, the City has secured funding for theright-of-way phase of the project but has not initiatedthat phaseyet; therefore, those secured funds can be considered when calculating the application’s “future eligible expense”for theproject.Table 1shows the projected application funding breakdown. Table 1. Project Application Funding OPTIONS:Move to authorize the City Manager or designee to apply for the BIPFiscal Year 2024grant for the Sullivan & Trent Interchange project or take other action. RECOMMENDED ACTION OR MOTION: Move to authorize the City Manager or designee, to apply for the BIPFiscal Year 2024grant for the Sullivan & Trent Interchange Projectin the amount of $33,587,992. BUDGET/FINANCIAL IMPACTS:The City has allocated $1,000,000 towards this projectin past budgets. All of these local funds are allocatedas local match to secured federal funds forthe engineering and right of way phases.Given the $5.24M of “Not Secured”funding, the City would need to secure those additional funds before any BIPfundsare obligated. To comply with the BIPprogram, none of the $5.24Mcanbe Federal funds. The City has contracted with an outside consultant for the developmentof a Benefit Cost Analysis(BCA)document for the FY24 RAISE application.Thedevelopment ofaBCA for the BIP application is not expected to have any additional cost. STAFF CONTACT:Adam Jackson, Engineering Manager Dan Baker, Assistant Engineer –Planning &Grants ____________________________________________________________________________ ATTACHMENTS: PowerPoint Page 2 of 2 CITY OF SPOKANE VALLEY Request for Council Action Meeting Date: February 6, 2024 Department Director Approval: Check all that apply: consent old business new business public hearing information admin. report pending legislation AGENDA ITEM TITLE:Motion Consideration: Planning Commission Mayoral Appointment GOVERNING LEGISLATION: Spokane Valley Municipal Code 18.10. PREVIOUS COUNCIL ACTION TAKEN: Planning Commissioners are routinely appointed to a three- year term. BACKGROUND: According to SVMC 18.10, members of the Planning Commission shall be nominated by the Mayor and confirmed by a majority vote of at least four members of the City Council. Planning Commissioners shall be selected without respect to political affiliations and shall serve without compensation. There was a resignation submitted by Mr. Val Dimitrov in January 2024. The applications received for the previous openings will also be considered for the vacancy in Mr. Dimitrov’s position. That position will be for a term of almost two full years from February 1, 2024, through December 31, 2025. Eight applications were submitted. Copies of all applications were distributed to the mayor. Announcements of the previous vacancies were posted on the City’s webpage, the City issued press releases, and the notice was published in the Valley News Herald and The Exchange. The deadline to submit an application was 4:00 p.m. December 22, 2023. OPTIONS: Confirm or not confirm, the Mayor’s nomination. If the Mayor’s nomination is not confirmed by Council, the Mayor may either make another nomination or the matter can be postponed. RECOMMENDED ACTION OR MOTION: “I move to confirm the Mayor’s nomination of Matthew Hurd to the Planning Commission for term beginning February 1, 2024 and ending December 31, 2025. BUDGET/FINANCIAL IMPACTS: n/a STAFF CONTACT: Mayor Haley ____________________________________________________________________________________ ATTACHMENTS: Planning Commission Applications CITY OF SPOKANE VALLEY Request for Council Action Meeting Date: February 6, 2024 Department Director Approval: Check all that apply: consent old business new business public hearing information admin. report pending legislation executive session AGENDA ITEM TITLE: Spokane Valley Police Department Recruiting and Retention Plan GOVERNING LEGISLATION: PREVIOUS COUNCIL ACTION TAKEN: BACKGROUND: Police Chief David Ellis will give an update on the Spokane Valley Police Department’s new recruiting and retention plan for 2024-2027. OPTIONS: Discussion/information RECOMMENDED ACTION OR MOTION: Discussion/Information BUDGET/FINANCIAL IMPACTS: N/A STAFF CONTACT: Police Chief Ellis ATTACHMENTS: PowerPoint Presentation Recruiting and Retention Plan Historical and current trendsRecruitingMaking Hiring Easier, Faster, and More EfficientProviding the Most Efficient and Effective Initial TrainingEmployee RetentionHiring Goals and Benchmarks PROVIDING THE MOST EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE INITIAL TRAINING RECRUITING AND RETENTION PLAN 2024-2027 Spokane Valley Police Department Chief David Ellis 1 2 Recruiting and Retention Plan Executive Summary /Spokane Valley Police Department conducted a three-day strategic planning session in December of 2023. As part of that session, various opportunities and threats were identified that project to have significant impacts on the agency in the future. The biggest threat identified was the difficulty law enforcement agencies both locally and nationwide face when hiring and retaining officers. As a result of identifying recruiting and employee retention as the highest priority Historical hiring and retention trends Recruiting efforts Streamlining hiring processes Employee training Employee retention During this review, efficiencies have been identified in each of these above- listed areas, as well as recommendations for improvement. short- and long-term strategies to reflect these recommendations. This plan will continue to evolve and improve as we evaluate successes and challenges based on historical data and real time results. Recruiting and Retention Plan 3 Historical and Current Trends According to the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), agencies similar in size to This factors in only the number of budgeted positions filled and does not reflect further manpower issues related to some of those filled positions being unavailable due to being assigned to the academy for initial training, injuries, PTSD, or family medical leave. A 2023 PERF survey asked agencies to provide their total sworn staffing numbers on January 1 of 2020, 2021, 2022, and 2023. Respondents reported that in January 2023, sworn staffing was 0.9 percent lower than in January 2022 and 4.8 percent lower than in January 2020. Recruiting and Retention Plan 4 Also, consistent from 2019 to 2020 but then jumped by more than 35 percent in 2021 and another 9 percent in 2022. There were 47 percent more resignations in 2022 than in 2019. ! Recruiting and Retention Plan 5 Lastly, Ps study found that sworn officer retirements increased more than 12 percent from 2019 to 2020 and more than 14 percent in 2021, then fell more than 7 percent in 2022. There were 19 percent more retirements in 2022 than in 2019. Looking internally separating from the agency due to retirements, terminations, changes in careers, or accepting positions with other law enforcement agencies. It is important to note this number does not reflect probationary officers who did not complete their probation period, which represents an additional attrition number. Recruiting and Retention Plan 6 Recruiting will bolster its recruiting efforts through a combination of targeted advertising, its use of a strengthened recruiting team, an enhanced compensation package, and a clearly defined chain of command. These initiatives include: Advertising: $30,000 annual budget for billboards in the north Idaho and eastern/central Washington areas, targeting lateral officers who could potentially transfer easily without moving expenses. $70,000 annual budget for a targeted social media campaign on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. -of-the- art training center, which will provide premier training for members of this agency. Recruiting and Retention Plan 7 center hosts thousands of officers from other agencies annually. To capitalize on that networking ability, the following opportunities exist: o Issue prox card lanyards that are wrapped in a graphic stating that the takes visiting officers to our hiring website. o Play our recruiting video on a large television in the main waiting lobby. o Affix large hiring banners to the exterior fence facing Highway 902, so that visiting officers see them when training at the regional training center. o Hiring literature will be displayed in each classroom. Public Information Officer (PIO). The PIO position is stretched thin with its responsibilities of responding to media requests and drafting press releases. Due to this, there is a gap in our ability to provide timely positive social media posts that could help engage the interest of a prospective applicant. To address this, the Spokane County Sheriff vetted group of employees who will be authorized to post short and positive LinkedIn, and Twitter accounts. lateral officers, and $10,000 for entry level officers. That offer expires in June of 2024, and needs to be renewed by the Board of County Commissioners. conduct in-person and online testing, allowing for the agency to reach applicants throughout the country. This has been an effective partnership and allows applicants to test for multiple agencies at the same time. The Spokane must pay for each agency they decide to test for. This practice should continue, but there are opportunities to enhance the partnership with PST. This includes: o The PST website shows current vacancies for each agency. For shows that they currently have 32 vacancies. However, when you click when there are significantly more. This needs to be corrected, as it could potentially discourage applicants from hiring if they think there is only one vacancy. o There is no link on the PST website for laterals to apply with the o The PST website needs to be updated to reflect 2024 salary tables (currently shows 2023 salary tables). Recruiting and Retention Plan 8 o The PST website benefits section needs to be updated to reflect the take-home car benefit. o The PST website should also show our recruiting video, like other agencies currently are. o Our $25,000 lateral hiring bonus information should also be listed on the PST website, as well as the $10,000 entry-level hiring bonus. o PST conducts tests in eastern Washington but is hosting them at the its state-of-the-art new training center, serve as an additional reason to apply with the Spokane County Office and enhance in-person contact with applicants. Recruiting Team: The recruiting team consists of a pool of approximately thirty deputies who assist with recruiting efforts as an auxiliary duty to their primary assignment. They will have a travel budget of $100,000 in 2024, which is used for attending recruiting events (travel costs, registration fees, and equipment). They have recently acquired a recruiting SUV along with a trailer that they tow to events and display out of. o The new recruiting trailer needs to be completed before being put into service, including a vinyl graphics wrap highlighting the agency. It also video on a loop. o and transferred temporarily to the recruiting SUV or any other patrol vehicles that are on display for recruiting events. This will be more cost efficient than putting permanent graphics on numerous recruiter vehicles. A referral bonus should be implemented, that rewards not just the recruiting team, but the entire agency for successfully recruiting a new employee. This has become a more common practice, with bonuses up to $3,000 (Springfield Police Department). Locally, the Washington State Patrol offers a $250 bonus a $500 signing bonus. If implemented, $250 will be paid to the referring employee at the time the recruited individual is commissioned, and the other $250 will be paid to the referring officer upon the new hires successful completion of probation. It is believed that this will also have a secondary benefit to the agency, as it will help provide mentors who have an even more vested interest in assisting new hires in successfully completing their training period. Recruiting and Retention Plan 9 The core of the recruiting team, along with Civil Service, should attend The recruiting team needs a coordinator who can focus on hiring, which has a non-commissioned civilian operating under a yearly contract. This will be a cost savings versus a commissioned employee and does not pull a deputy away from law enforcement duties. This employee will also be responsible for providing formalized quarterly and annual reports that detail our hiring efforts and progress. This position can be funded by temporarily converting a vacant unincorporated position. When vacancies are mostly filled, this civilian recruiting position can be converted back to its original commissioned position. The Training Unit recently staffed a new support staff position. This position will assist the recruiting team by researching job fairs, registering for them, coordinating travel arrangements, and scheduling recruiters to attend. These events should include: o Career fairs, including military, colleges, county fairs, and all in-person PST tests. Establish a criminal justice liaison to local colleges, who will assist with teaching classes and highlighting opportunities within the agency for criminal justice students. The responsibility for recruiting has been fluid and changed multiple times within the agency. A clearly defined chain of command needs to be established, which will assist in communication and accountability. houses. This was an opportunity for prospective applicants to learn more about the agency, as well as how to navigate the hiring process and become a better applicant. The hiring open houses should resume at our new training center and be held quarterly at a minimum. To Office should engage in long-term strategies. These should include bolstering the Explorer program, which provides teenagers with an opportunity to volunteer with the agency, learn basic policing skills, and become better prepared for a career in law enforcement. The Explorer team should also host a career day for the local high schools, where students will have the opportunity to see the different opportunities and career paths at the Explorer program as well. Recruiting and Retention Plan 10 program, but eventually was discontinued due to a multitude of factors including COVID, state legislative difficulties in training, etc. The reserve deputy program can serve as a workforce multiplier, and as an alternative pathway to becoming a full-time Spokane County deputy. The Spokane County host a reserve academy and reinstate this program. The state of Idaho has a self-sponsored program, where people interested in a career in law enforcement can self-sponsor themselves through the Idaho Peace Officers and Standards (POST) Academy. Self-sponsored students pay for themselves to attend the academy, and then are eligible to work with whatever agency recruits them. The benefits of this program from an agency perspective are to better know an applicant before hiring them, being able to speak to academy staff about their performance and knowing that they have successfully completed the academy. Agencies frequently send recruiters to the Idaho POST Academy and target self-sponsored students. The Spokane ,000 signing bonus to lateral officers, and a $10,000 signing bonus for entry-level officers. Historically the Spokane County Detention Services has served as a strong feeder ground for policy prohibits current Spokane County employees from being eligible for the $10,000 entry-level bonus. As a result of this policy, current Spokane County Detention Services corrections officers are no longer applying with the Department (seven in 2023) which still offers them a signing bonus. This policy needs to be changed, as it is having the effect of discouraging current Spokane County Detention Services employees from working at the Spokane lice Department. Recruiting and Retention Plan 11 Making Hiring Easier, Faster, and More Efficient utilizes the Spokane County Civil Service for the testing and promotion of all employees, and all tests are given under the jurisdiction of the Spokane County Civil Service Commission. Once an eligibility list is certified by the Spokane County Civil Service Commission, the Training Unit is tasked with coordinating interviews, background investigations, and other selection criteria like polygraphs, psychological evaluations, and a medical evaluation. As part of this review, these suggestions are offered to streamline the hiring process and shorten the length of time needed from initial testing to the date of hire: Reduce the burden on applicants to travel to Spokane County for testing and processing by: o Continue to use PST for initial testing of entry level applicants. o Move to virtual interviews (integrity interviews and oral board), which will speed up the hiring process by weeks. o Eliminate the agency entry-level obstacle course physical agility test (PAT), as the WSCJTC test is already completed at two other levels (first via PST, and then second by the Washington State Criminal Justice Commission as part of the admittance process to the Basic Law Enforcement Academy). This will potentially eliminate up to a month of processing time. o For lateral applicants, conduct virtual physical agility tests or allow them (identical to how PST currently conducts entry-level PATs). o Allow for the fingerprint process to be conducted at a venue close to where the applicant lives, versus the current process of having to come to Spokane County for fingerprinting. Currently the Training Unit has one commissioned deputy and three part-time contract background investigators. There are currently three vacant background investigator positions, which is having an impact on the ability of the Training Unit to quickly process applicants. Moving forward, we will be converting the full-time deputy position into a full-time civilian position, with the benefit of creating salary savings as well as freeing up a commissioned officer to focus on law enforcement duties. It will also be a priority to fill the vacant contract background investigator positions. Recruiting and Retention Plan 12 o background investigator positions, we will backfill that workload by contracting with PST to conduct background investigations on non- commissioned staff. This will allow for critical support staff positions to be staffed quicker and background investigators to focus on processing commissioned applicants. Once capacity is built back up in the background investigators cadre, we can resume processing non-commissioned applicants in-house. o To help shorten the time needed to hire applicants while also making it more convenient for applicants, background investigators will be encouraged to offer interviews in the evenings and weekends. This will prevent the applicant from having to take time off from their current job to attend our interview process. It is common to hear from applicants that they go months without any contact from the agency (even though processing may be going on behind the scenes). As the background investigator cadre is returned to full staffing, they will be tasked with reaching out to applicants weekly, confirming to them the the hiring process. This will keep the applicant engaged and committed to applying elsewhere. Years ago, Civil Service consisted of three full-time employees, but now is budgeted for 2.6 full-time employees (FTEs). It is recommended that Civil Service be restored to three full time employees to ensure the quick processing of applicants. In the past, it has been determined that there has been a delay from when the Civil Service Commission has certified a hiring list, to the time that affected non-commissioned units became aware of applicants needing to be scheduled for interviews. It is recommended that once a list is certified by the Civil Service Commission, the Training Unit is immediately notified. The Training Unit will then send an email to affected non-commissioned units, instructing them to schedule oral boards immediately. o As capacity is increased in the background investigator unit, that unit will now start the background process immediately, versus waiting for the hiring interviews to occur (which should also occur virtually). Spokane County Civil Service currently uses NeoGov as its online application portal. It has been described as clunky and not user-friendly by applicants. In 2025, Spokane County is switching to a new online application portal called Workday. This will hopefully simplify the application process. Recruiting and Retention Plan 13 For lateral applicants, Civil Service requires that they submit their academy curriculum at the time of application. This can be difficult to obtain at the initial point of application, and could serve as a discouraging factor. This should be changed so that it is later obtained as part of the background investigation process, giving the applicant more time to obtain the curriculum. In 2023, the Spokane County Civil Service reported 25 percent of all applications were rejected (incomplete, duplicates, did not meet qualifications). An additional 21 percent of applicants did not turn in the required paperwork within the required fourteen days (transcripts or personal history forms). Lastly, five percent of all applicants withdrew their applications. This equates to 46 percent of all applicants not being processed for various reasons. Spokane County Human Resources has offered to survey those applicants to determine why this occurred. This information will help us identify if our process is too complicated, too slow, if our salary and benefits package was not competitive, or any other reasons. Recruiting and Retention Plan 14 Providing the Most Efficient and Effective Initial Training Training Unit is tasked with conducting the initial training for all newly commissioned officers. This process can take up to a year or longer to accomplish. Required training currently includes: Enforcement Academy (BLEA) approximately five months (720 hours) Post academy approximately six weeks Field training program approximately four months (can be extended if the trainee needs additional field training) In addition to this near year-long process, the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission has a waiting list of approximately four months for admittance into the Basic Law Enforcement Academy. This means that when a deputy is hired by the , they are caught in a limbo situation where they are unable to begin the field training program because they have not completed the BLEA. To streamline the initial training process, the will implement the following recommendations: Host up to four BLEA sessions at our new training center. This will increase capacity for eastern Washington BLEA students, shortening the wait time for admittance. This will also allow the Training Unit to more closely monitor our trainees learning and growth and be able to better tailor their field training program upon graduation from the academy. Conduct a review of the post-academy training curriculum, and determine what is essential and what can be eliminated or deferred to the field training program. A review of the new WSCJTC BLEA curriculum should occur and determine if there are any redundancies that can be eliminated that would shorten the post academy. WSCJTC continues to delay our trainees from attending the first available BLEA, choosing to delay them until the Spokane BLEAs are held. Clear communication needs to be had with WSCJTC executive staff, instructing them to register trainees for the first BLEA being held in the state, regardless of the location. Recruiting and Retention Plan 15 Formalize a -training program for new hires who are waiting to be admitted to BLEA. This will include shifting portions of the post academy to this waiting phase (i.e. unit briefings like DSA, OPS, K9, SWAT, ASU, EDU, etc.). This could include structured ride-alongs or formalized training programs at the front desk or Rig 9, with the goal of making the trainee better prepared to complete the field training program. A complete review of the field training program, with the goal of increasing our current training completion rate of 47.3 percent since 2014. Recruiting and Retention Plan 16 Employee Retention Th years and will likely continue that trend for the next five years. The Spokane County another 23 will be eligible in the next three years or less. Total number of Commissioned Staff = 229 Average age is 40.6 Average Average service time is 11 years % of Service Workforce ΛƭĻƩǝźĭĻ ƷźƒĻ ķƚĻƭ ƓƚƷ ĭƚǒƓƷ ƚƷŷĻƩ \[9 ĻǣƦΜ Time 12% 28 eligible for retirement (53+ & vested) 24.18 10% 23 could retire in next 3 years (50+) 21.57 27% 62 in their 40s 12.39 38% 88 in their 30s 5.39 12% 28 in their 20s 3.18 When reviewing the total non-probationary attrition (retirements, terminations, accepting employment elsewhere, etc. averaged a loss of 25 deputies per year for the last decade. To help increase employee retention, as well as become a more attractive location for prospective applicants, numerous opportunities were evaluated including compensation, morale, and internal opportunities. These recommendations include: Overall salary benefits should be reviewed to ensure the Spokane County remains competitive in its job market. An area of concern is illustrated by the number of lateral applications received over the last ten years, and the possible correlation in a steep decline in 2023 after the Spokane Police Guild settled their labor contract and received a significant applications from 135 deputy sheriff lateral (DSL) applicants in 2021, and 105 in 2022. Once the Spokane Police Guild contract was settled for 2023, Although not as dramatic, a drop was also seen in 2023 in the number of applications for the Officer Candidate Deputy Sheriff (OCDS) position, commonly referred to as entry-level deputy. Recruiting and Retention Plan 17 Deputy Sheriff Applications Received 2013 - 2023 OCDS DSL-I DSL Total Apps 2013 179 0 17 196 2014 343 29 46 418 2015 480 24 44 548 2016 326 16 32 374 2017 360 16 56 432 2018 395 20 62 477 2019 391 21 50 462 2020 422 20 65 507 2021 582 41 135 758 2022 459 28 105 592 2023 415 25 38 478 Implementation of a medical VEBA plan should be explored as an incentive that could help retain employees after they are eligible for retirement. An example of this could be to offer any employee who has more than twenty years of service an employer medical VEBA contribution of $150 per month. This could entice senior employees to extend their careers with the Spokane This would help provide post-retirement health care, which could be appealing. Offer lateral applicants to transfer their years of service to the Spokane example, an officer with ten years of service from another agency would be allowed to accrue vacation and sick leave at the same rate as a ten-year Spokane County employee. Establish a starting vacation and sick leave balance for lateral officers of 40 hours. This could be appealing for lateral officers who are more likely to have families already, and could potentially need a starting leave balance to care for their family if they left their current agency. Recruiting and Retention Plan 18 Provide tuition reimbursement of one course per quarter at a college to be determined. The courses would need to be approved in advance by the agency, and would be chosen as ones that would benefit the Spokane County Maintain existing employee wellness programs like heart screening and mental health services. Human Resources suggests that the costs for heart screening could be funded by insurance offsets. Maintain the $25,000 lateral signing bonus, and the $10,000 entry level st signing bonus, which is currently set to expire July 1, 2024. Establish monthly drop-in shoots at the new training center, both for a proficiency purpose and also as a morale builder. Provide opportunities to probationary employees who have good aptitude, but are unable to handle the demands of being a commissioned officer, to move into non-commissioned spots within Spokane County. This could include support staff positions, or even assignments at the Spokane County Detention Services. This benefits Spokane County by quickly moving a willing employee to another critical position without the need for another hiring process, background investigation, and reduced training. This could even take the look of a temporary loan to Spokane County Detention Services, allowing the employee to gain experience and seasoning. At the completion of the loan, provide another opportunity to that employee as a patrol deputy, or they could decide to stay as a corrections officer permanently. Encourage legislators to pass House Bill 2167, which would allow retired officers to return to work for up to 1040 hours per year while still being eligible for retirement benefits. This could extend the length of employees https://lawfilesext.leg.wa.gov/biennium/2023- 24/Pdf/Bills/House%20Bills/2167.pdf?q=20240114190354 Recruiting and Retention Plan 19 Hiring Goals and Benchmarks It will be important to have performance benchmarks for our recruiting and retention plan, as this document needs to be a living document that can change depending on our successes and challenges. Some of these metrics will include identifying how many applications are needed per year, what our attrition rate is, what our training completion percentage is, and how many vacancies the Spokane vacancies, and it is anticipated that the Spokane Valley Police Department desires to increase their staffing by approximately thirty officers over the course of the next four years, for a total of 65 commissioned vacancies. averaged a loss of 25 deputies per year due to retirements, change of careers, lateraling to other agencies, etc. If this trend continues, that equates to 100 combined with the 65 current vacancies, it equates to 165 deputies needing to be hired before the end of 2027. Another factor to be considered is the ten-year average of new hires successfully completing probation, which is 47.3 percent. The Training Unit is reviewing their new hire training program in an effort to increase that rate, but historical data should not be dismissed either. applications for the deputy position, and hired 264. This equates to an average of approximately 20 applications needed to hire one employee. If that number is extrapolated over the projected need to hire 165 deputies, it is anticipated that the ,276 applicants before the end of 2027. If you factor in the 47.3 successful completion rate for new applicants, the Spokane fice would need to hire approximately 330 deputies, and receive 6,550 applications. Recruiting and Retention Plan 20 Deputy Sheriff Applications Received 2013 - 2023 OCDS DSL-I DSL Total Apps 2013 179 0 17 196 2014 343 29 46 418 2015 480 24 44 548 2016 326 16 32 374 2017 360 16 56 432 2018 395 20 62 477 2019 391 21 50 462 2020 422 20 65 507 2021 582 41 135 758 2022 459 28 105 592 2023 415 25 38 478 Deputy Sheriff Hires 2013 - 2023 OCDS DSL-I DSL Total Hires 2013 7 0 2 9 2014 11 3 7 21 2015 12 2 5 19 2016 19 0 6 25 2017 13 0 5 18 2018 23 0 9 32 2019 24 0 8 32 2020 16 0 7 23 2021 15 1 14 30 2022 14 2 22 38 2023 11 0 6 17 Recruiting and Retention Plan 21 With those parameters established, and recognizing the time needed to scale up the Recruiting and Retention Plan in 2024 hiring goals are: Year Applications Deputies Hired 2024 1300 65 2025 1500 75 2026 1800 90 2027 1950 100 It is important to note that these hiring goals are based on the historical hiring and retention data for over last ten years. If there are improvements in the trainee probation completion rate, a decrease in retirements, or increased retention, these goals could be adjusted downwards and be easier to attain. Recruiting and Retention Plan CITY OF SPOKANE VALLEY Request for Council Action Meeting Date:February 6, 2024 Department Director Approval: Check all that apply: consent old business new business public hearing information admin. report pending legislation executive session AGENDA ITEM TITLE: Administration Report- Pines Road/BNSF Grade Separation Project Update GOVERNING LEGISLATION: None PREVIOUS COUNCIL ACTION TAKEN: May 7, 2013: Administrative report, Bridging the Valley, June 23, 2015: Council passed Resolution No. 15-005 adopting the 2016-2021 Six Year Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), which included the project January 10, 2017: Motion consideration to acquire Pinecroft property February 28, 2017: Council passed Resolution 17-006, amending the 2017 TIP which included the project March 28, 2017: Administrative report seeking Council consensus to move forward with project design May 23, 2017: Resolution No. 17-011 adopting the 2018-2023 Six-Year TIP, which included the project July 11, 2017: Motion consideration to select a Consultant for Phase 1 Design October 17, 2017: Admin Report on Design Alternatives March 27, 2018: Motion consideration to apply for Spokane Regional Transportation Council’s (SRTC) federal grants, including the project May 22, 2018: Motion consideration to apply for Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements Program, FY2017, (CRISI #1) grant for the project June 5, 2018: Motion consideration to apply for Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development (BUILD) grant August 21, 2018: Motion consideration to apply for Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements Program, FY2018, (CRISI #2) grant December 4, 2018: Admin Report on Design Alternatives June 4, 2019: Admin Report on Design Alternatives June 4, 2019: Motion consideration to apply for BUILD grant June 18, 2019: Motion consideration to advance Alternative 2 to Phase 2 design April 14, 2020: Motion consideration to apply for BUILD grant May 5, 2020: Motion consideration to authorize city manager to execute design agreement with HDR July 7, 2020: Motion consideration to authorize city manager to acquire the DeWitt Living Trust property July 7, 2020: Motion consideration to authorize city manager to acquire the DeRuwe property April 12, 2022: Motion consideration to authorize city manager to accept Avista Property Donation July 18, 2023: Admin Report for Project Update August 22, 2023: Motion consideration for Final Action Ordinance for Condemnation BACKGROUND: Since 2017, the City has been working on the Pines Road/BNSF Railroad Grade Separation Project. The project will grade separate the BNSF tracks from Pines Road (State Route 27) by constructing an underpass, realign Pines Road to the east, replace the signalized intersection of Pines Road and Trent Avenue (State Route 290) with a double lane roundabout, and construct a new trailhead for the Centennial Trail. Design is nearing completion. Staff is actively coordinating utility relocations with several purveyors including Phillips 66/Yellowstone Pipeline, Avista Utilities, Irvin Water District, Lumen Technology, Cogent Communications, AT&T, Comcast, Verizon, and Zayo. Seven properties were acquired using the early ROW acquisition process, including three that were donated from Avista Utilities. The final ROW phase includes partial acquisitions from twelve additional property owners. The city has reached agreement with eleven property owners. Negotiations have been unsuccessful to date with one property owner, so the city is proceeding with condemnation efforts. The project has secured full funding from several different funding sources and agencies including the following: Consolidated Rail Infrastructure & Safety Improvements (CRISI) $ 1,246,500 Surface Transportation Program (STP) $ 3,795,000 Congressional Discretionary Spending (CDS) $ 5,000,000 Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) $ 4,879,000 Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) $ 1,525,600 Rebuilding American Infrastructure w/ Sustainability & Equity (RAISE) $ 21,689,221 Move Ahead Washington State Funding $ 5,000,000 The funding sources have different requirements and processes. The USDOT grants (CRISI and RAISE) have lengthy approval processes. For example, the CRISI grant was executed approximately 10 months after receiving the award letter. The City received the award letter for RAISE agreement in October 2022 and is still working through the approval process. FRA granted pre-obligation authority in January 2024 which allows the City to pay for the bridge construction by BNSF forces and utility relocations prior to execution of the RAISE agreement. Cardinal Infrastructure, the City’s federal lobbyist, and the federal delegation advocated for the City to receive the pre-award approval. They have also offered their assistance to expediate the next necessary approvals. The City received FHWA grants which are typically administered by Washington Department of Transportation (WSDOT) Local Programs. Staff requested to transfer the administration of these FHWA funds to FRA. FRA has indicated that funds transfer will require a separate grant agreement as the FHWA funds cannot be combined with RAISE funds in a grant agreement. The funds transfer will streamline the construction approval process by limiting conflicting requirements from the two federal funding agencies. The RAISE agreement and FHWA funds transfer agreement need to be executed prior to soliciting bids for the roadway construction project. Staff has extensively coordinated with BNSF and is negotiating a Construction and Maintenance (C&M) agreement. This agreement currently includes the construction of the railroad bridges by BNSF forces, property rights for the permanent roadway easement across BNSF property, and project construction and maintenance requirements. BNSF can construct the bridges more efficiently than a city contractor, since work by BNSF forces does not require continual submittals with lengthy review times. BNSF has some concerns with RAISE provisions included in the agreement that are required to fund the bridge construction. City staff and BNSF have been working with FRA attorneys, and consultants to understand the obligations of BNSF and develop a level of comfort with the new RAISE provisions. This is the first agreement with RAISE provisions that BNSF is attempting to work under, requiring more coordination between FRA and BNSF. The project tentative schedule and next steps are: Winter and Spring of 2024 o Finalize the BNSF C&M Agreement o Hire a construction management consultant o Execute the RAISE agreement o Certify ROW o Complete utility relocations o Execute FHWA funds agreement o Finalize construction documents o Obligate all federal and state funds Summer/Fall of 2024 o Construction of BNSF railroad bridges o Advertise roadway & trailhead project for bids OPTIONS: Discussion only RECOMMENDED ACTION OR MOTION: Discussion only BUDGET/FINANCIAL IMPACTS: The project is fully funded with a combination of local, state and federal funds. STAFF CONTACT: Bill Helbig, PE –Public Works Director Erica Amsden, PE – CIP Engineering Manager Gloria Mantz, PE – City Services Administrator ___________________________________________________________________________ ATTACHMENTS: Presentation CITY OF SPOKANE VALLEY Request for Council Action Meeting Date: February 6, 2024 Department Director Approval: Check all that apply: consent old business new business public hearing information admin. report pending legislation executive session AGENDA ITEM TITLE: Housing & Urban Development (HUD) 2024 Program Update GOVERNING LEGISLATION: CDBG – Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 24 CFR § 570; Chapter 39.34 RCW PREVIOUS COUNCIL ACTION TAKEN: In 2023, Council elected to defer its entitlement and to participate as part of the urban county consortium for the next three-year cycle (2024-2026). BACKGROUND: The City of Spokane Valley is a member of the Spokane County urban consortium for the HUD Entitlement Funds including the Community Development Block Grant, the Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME) and the Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG). Each year the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development provides HUD entitlement funding to Spokane County. In 2023, the City entered into a new cooperation agreement (attached) that increased the City’s set-aside for CDBG, HOME and ESG based on its share of Consortium population. In previous agreements, the City did not have a set-aside for the HOME and ESG funds. Currently, Spokane County is accepting requests for proposals for the use of HUD entitlement funds for the program year 2024. Tonight, staff will present an overview of the CDBG, HOME, and ESG funding and potential opportunities for city-initiated applications or for supporting providers that provide services to Spokane Valley. RECOMMENDED ACTION OR MOTION: None. BUDGET/FINANCIAL IMPACTS: There are no expected budget impacts directly to the City. STAFF CONTACT: Gloria Mantz, City Services Administrator and Eric Robinson, Housing and Homeless Coordinator ATTACHMENTS: PowerPoint Presentation 2024-2026 Urban Consortium Agreement CDBG Application and Award History Page 1 of 1 Objectives Funding Criteria – CDBG CDBG Project Types Spokane County Priority Projects – CDBG Historical Awards – CDBG income people - aside $290K - Building, buying, and/or rehabilitating affordable housing for rent or homeownershipDirect rental assistance to lowPermanent supportiveMulti family serving LMI individualsSenior housingTransitional housing$2.75M regionwideCity set ———————— HOME Project Types & Funding housing activity - aside $45K - Rehabilitate or convert buildings for use as emergency sheltersCertain expenses for the operation of emergency sheltersEssential services related to emergency sheltersStreet outreach for the homelessHomeless prevention and rapid re2024 is the first year that Spokane County is eligible for ESG$225k regionwideCity set ———————— ESG Project Types & Funding COMMENTS Did not apply supported catherine Johnson apptmnets applicationIncluded in Project 0347Did not apply. City's funds were directly used by county for project.Did not apply. City's funds were directly used by county for project.City match includes SW funds. Awarded funds less than requested due to PE + Inspection request conflictCity match includes SW funds. Awarded funds less than requested due to PE + Inspection request conflictCity turned back funds. Blake Rd. residents did not want project.Started as resurfacing plus ADA, scope reduced to ADA only 89,376 253,772425,863 154,605 458,616 467,961 439,268 391,782 263,718 232,038 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ PROJECT COST - - - - 45,78644,60610,17351,81956,26531,956 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ CITY MATCH 72,138 358,076358,133287,426343,206453,895358,790261,794183,609115,410 AWARD $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 72,138 308,296358,076358,133294,533350,849337,075453,895358,790261,794337,075183,609387,500 REQUEST $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 85,784 348,551 403,862402,739 339,245 399,471 348,655 485,851 389,987 287,094 348,655 216,720 391,340 ESTIMATE $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ NoNoNoNoNo YesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes AWARDED CDBGCDBGCDBGCDBGCDBGCDBGCDBGCDBGCDBG CDBGCDBGCDBGCDBGCDBGCDBG FUNDING SOURCE PROJECT 4th Ave. Sidewalk - Eastern to Catherine Johnson AptsPark Road Sidewalk (Broadway to Cataldo)Barker Road Homes (Street Reconstruction + Sewer Extension)Barker Road Homes (Street Reconstruction + Sewer Extension)Ella Road Sidewalk - Broadway to AlkiConklin Road Sidewalk - Appleway Trail to Riceland LaneKnox Ave. Sidewalk - Sargent to HutchinsonWilbur Road Sidewalk - Boone to BroadwayBlake Road Sidewalk, 8th to Appleway Trail8th Ave Sidewalk Improvements - Dickey to Thierman - North SideSeth Woodard Elementary Sidewalk Improvement Mission & ParkSprague/Long Sidewalk Project (Greenacres SW project)Blake Road Sidewalk, 8th to Appleway TrailAdams Rd Resurfacing, Sprague to 4thSprague ADA Ramps, Havana to Fancher PROJECT #0344030203030279027802640234020601860171 YEAR 2023202220212020201920182018201720172016201620152014201320122011 DRAFT ADVANCE AGENDA as of February 1, 2024; 10:00 a.m. Please note this is a work in progress; items are tentative To: Council & Staff From: City Clerk, by direction of City Manager Re: Draft Schedule for Upcoming Council Meetings February 13, 2024 Strategic Planning Workshop, 9:45 a.m. -2:45 p.m Agenda to be provided Special Meeting February 20, 2024 Study Session, 6:00p.m. \[due Tue Feb 13\] 1. Admin Report: RCO Grant Opportunity, Balfour Park - John Bottelli (5 minutes) 2. Admin Report: RCO Grant Update, Flora Park John Bottelli (15 minutes) 3. Admin Report: 2024 Capital Improvement Projects Erica Amsden & Robert Lochmiller (15 minutes) 4. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) \[*estimated meeting: 40 mins\] February 27, 2024 Formal Meeting, 6:00 p.m. \[due Tue Feb 20\] Proclamation: Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month 1. Consent Agenda (claims, payroll, minutes) (5 minutes) 2. Motion Consideration: Potential Grant Opportunity, HUD Gloria Mantz (5 minutes) 3. Admin Report: Franchise Agreement, Wholesail Networks, LLC Tony Beattie (5 minutes) 4. Admin Report: Franchise Agreement Ziply Fiber Pacific, LLC Tony Beattie (5 minutes) 5. Admin Report: Public Safety Discussion Erik Lamb (30 minutes) 6. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) 7. Info Only: Department Monthly Reports; Fire Dept Monthly Report March 5, 2024 Study Session, 6:00 p.m. \[due Tue Feb 27\] 1. Admin Report: Capital Projects Grants Review Adam Jackson, Dan Baker (15 minutes) 2. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) March 12, 2024 Formal Meeting, 6:00 p.m. \[due Tue March 5\] 1. Consent Agenda (claims, payroll, minutes) (5 minutes) 2. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) March 19, 2024 Study Session, 6:00 p.m. \[due Tue March 12\] 1. Admin Report: Arts Council Contract Virginia Clough, Sarah Farr (5 minutes) 2. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) March 26, 2024 Formal Meeting, 6:00 p.m. \[due Tue March 19\] 1. Consent Agenda (claims, payroll, minutes) (5 minutes) 2. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) 3. Info Only: Department Monthly Reports; Fire Dept Monthly Report April 2, 2024 Study Session, 6:00 p.m. \[due Tue March 26\] 1. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) April 9, 2024 Formal Meeting, 6:00 p.m. \[due Tue April 2\] 1. Consent Agenda (claims, payroll, minutes) (5 minutes) 2. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) April 16, 2024 Study Session, 6:00 p.m. \[due Tue April 9\] 1. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) April 23, 2024 Formal Meeting, 6:00 p.m. \[due Tue April 16\] 1. Consent Agenda (claims, payroll, minutes) (5 minutes) Draft Advance Agenda 2/1/2024 2:53:34 PM Page 1 of 2 2. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) 3. Info Only: Department Monthly Reports; Fire Dept Monthly Report April 30, 2024 Study Session, 6:00 p.m. \[due Tue April 23\] 1. Advance Agenda Mayor Haley (5 minutes) *time for public or council comments not included OTHER PENDING AND/OR UPCOMING ISSUES/MEETINGS: 9-1-1 calls (delays, holding, etc.) Appleway Trail Amenities CTR Agreement Ethics Code Gang Task Force Update Mirabeau Park Forestry Mgmt. ORV usage on streets Park Camera Update Park Lighting Peer Court PFD Presentation Public Safety Comparison Protection of Utility Infrastructures SCRAPS Street Scaping, signs, trees, etc.(info) Vehicle Wgt Infrastructure Impact Yellowstone Franchise Agreement City Brand Update Draft Advance Agenda 2/1/2024 2:53:34 PM Page 2 of 2